GNU/Linux / Desktop

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=Multiple desktops=
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I think you should use desktops more. You can group windows by activities - one desktop for messaging stuff, one for music, one for web browsing, use the pager or the window list (which is on the top right in a gnome setup) to move between desktops. I typically use six desktops, and there is no need for minimizing windows. The taskbar isn't needed anymore.
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I've never understood the use of taskbars in a system with virtual desktops. It makes sense in the Other OS, but I've never seen the point in GNOME.
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My browser is always in desktop 3; my terminal is always in #1, my music is always in #4, etc. Having an omnipresent widget just to tell me which apps are open seems like a bad use of screen real estate; I know exactly where my apps are without even thinking about it. Learning to be consistent in which programs you open on which desktops really pays off.
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Then again, maybe it just works well for me since I am a web developer, and I have a predictable set of programs open at all time with little variance.
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=Panels=
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==Trying to get the taskbar (window list) to take 2 rows instead of one==
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http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?p=2003626

Revision as of 22:22, 6 August 2007

Aliases: GNU/Linux / X Windowing System, GNU/Linux / Graphical environment,

This information will be about Ubuntu and GNOME unless specified otherwise.

Contents

Selecting text copies it to the middle-click buffer

[Differences from Windows (category)]

I like!

At first I didn't think I liked this, having two different clipboard buffers... But I think the benefits outweigh the drawbacks here: It is so convenient to be able to select text and have it automatically copied to the clipboard and then be able to paste to another application with only a single click, without ever touching the keyboard!.

I used to have it set up to be almost as convenient on Windows: I just had to select the text, press the Windows key (mapped to copy), switch to the other app, and press CapsLock (paste).

On the other hand, ... I'm more of a keyboard-lover than a mouse-lover, and I don't know of any way to access the middle-click buffer from the keyboard. Does anyone else know a way??

[Differences from Windows (category)]

[Firefox (category)]: Drag and drop of the address bar only gives URL

When you drag the address bar (or the icon beside it) to another app (a textarea in another browser window), I'm used to having it insert the URL as well as the title. In X / Gnome, it looks like it only inserts the URL. (Oh well. At least it's usually pretty easy to copy and paste the title of the page using the middle button...)

Somewhat advanced stuff

Startup scripts

http://ubuntu.wordpress.com/2005/09/07/adding-a-startup-script-to-be-run-at-bootup/

http://oldfield.wattle.id.au/luv/boot.html#init

http://www.acm.uiuc.edu/workshops/cool_unix/xinitrc.html

http://web.mit.edu/answers/xwindows/xwindows_xmodmap.html

http://www.jwz.org/xkeycaps/

http://www.in-ulm.de/~mascheck/X11/xmodmap.html

How to remap keys

http://www.xfree86.org/4.2.0/xmodmap.1.html

gksu

man gksu:

       gksu - GTK+ frontend for su and sudo

SYNOPSIS
       gksu

       gksu [-u <user>] [options] <command>

       gksudo [-u <user>] [options] <command>

DESCRIPTION
       gksu is a frontend to su and gksudo is a frontend to sudo.  Their primary purpose is to run graphical commands that need root without the need to run an X terminal
       emulator and using su directly.

       Notice that all the magic is done by the underlying library, libgksu. Also notice that the library will decide if it should use su or sudo  as  backend  using  the
       /apps/gksu/sudo-mode  gconf  key,  if  you  call the gksu command. You can force the backend by using the gksudo command, or by using the --sudo-mode and --su-mode
       options.

       If no command is given, the gksu program will display a small window that allows you to type in a command to be run, and to select what user the program should  be
       run as. The other options are disregarded, right now, in this mode.


[Nautilus (category)]

Customizing the context menu

Templates

~/Templates

Scripts

.gnome2/~/nautilus-scripts/

umask / default file permissions

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=40617

Multiple desktops

http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/gerv/archives/2005/06/taskbars.html. Retrieved on 2007-05-11 11:18.


I think you should use desktops more. You can group windows by activities - one desktop for messaging stuff, one for music, one for web browsing, use the pager or the window list (which is on the top right in a gnome setup) to move between desktops. I typically use six desktops, and there is no need for minimizing windows. The taskbar isn't needed anymore.


I've never understood the use of taskbars in a system with virtual desktops. It makes sense in the Other OS, but I've never seen the point in GNOME. My browser is always in desktop 3; my terminal is always in #1, my music is always in #4, etc. Having an omnipresent widget just to tell me which apps are open seems like a bad use of screen real estate; I know exactly where my apps are without even thinking about it. Learning to be consistent in which programs you open on which desktops really pays off. Then again, maybe it just works well for me since I am a web developer, and I have a predictable set of programs open at all time with little variance.


Panels

Trying to get the taskbar (window list) to take 2 rows instead of one

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?p=2003626


Sound and video

Codecs

I used EasyUbuntu to get the codecs, but there are probably other ways.

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