Web applications

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Web applications  edit   (Category  edit)


Contents

Definition

Philosophy

Elevator Up (http://www.elevatorup.com/). Retrieved on 2007-05-11 11:18.


We develop things that people want to use and come back to. We focus on what you have to say and delivering that to your audience the way they want to receive it. Gone are the days of thinking about ourselves or what a company board deems important - give your customers what they're looking for and you'll get more of them. If the idea of this makes sense and you're looking to partner with a company that wants to help you communicate with customers, you're ready to take the Elevator Up.

http://7dots.com/. Retrieved on 2007-05-11 11:18.


...

  • API - so you can use the service how you want, and in new and interesting ways.
...

Eventable - Online Event Registration (making life simple) (https://www.eventable.com/). Retrieved on 2007-05-11 11:18.


Why did we develop this?

The Eventable team is focused on helping others create community and share passion. We noticed that getting people together was a tough hurdle and decided to do something about it.


Applications

balloon

[Ruby (category)] [Nice project sites (category)] star_full.gif star_full.gif star_full.gif

Very, very slick!

http://balloon.hobix.com/


Create a Script ... [checks name availability as you type] A short name for your script, will be seen in the link. what's recent? / rss

  • tyler_svn_configure 4 minutes ago by TylerRick
what's popular?
  • hpricot executed 1,151 times
  • tepee executed 553 times
  • test executed 437 times
looking deeper? list all / chronologically / by executions

http://balloon.hobix.com/


This is a balloon. Balloons are web pages that double as Ruby programs. To run this page: ruby -ropen-uri -e 'eval(open("http://balloon.hobix.com/test").read)' BE ALERT! Running this script could be dangerous. Be sure to review this page. You know: it's like anything else on the Internet. test, a balloon by why The balloon test script. Shows off all the features of Balloon.

   1. Runs some Ruby.
      Click here to view the code. [Expands inline]

   2. Connects to gem server at code.whytheluckystiff.net.

   3. Runs some Ruby.
      Click here to view the code. [Expands inline]

   4. Fetches the mongrel gem.

   5. Runs some Ruby.
      Click here to view the code. [Expands inline]

This script also available as:

  • Ruby
  • YAML

http://balloon.hobix.com/@edit/tyler_svn_configure


Briefly, what does this script do? The first sentence will be used as a summary. And the complete message will be displayed to folks who are running your script. ... Run some Ruby Enter some Ruby code. Please, keep it civil! ... Add new actions: / Save

http://balloon.hobix.com/~TylerRick


TylerRick’s scripts a ballooner for 10 minutes thus far Your scripts will not appear on the front page until you have actually executed them. tyler_svn_configure

  • hide
  • embed
  • edit
  • remove
  • no runs since created 10 minutes ago, hasn't hit the home page yet

http://balloon.hobix.com/@embed/tyler_svn_configure

7dots password management tool

Aaron Schaap (December 24, 2005). What is 7dots (http://blog.7dots.com/articles/2005/12/24/what-is-7dots). Retrieved on 2007-05-11 11:18.


Everyone’s been asking us what 7dots is and what’s going on behind the scenes. To get a post kicked-off, I thought I’d spill a few beans on what the product is and why we decided to develop it. So what is it? 7dots is a password management tool. For those, like myself, that have a need to keep track of so many client usernames and passwords, it becomes extremely difficult to keep them all organized and easy to recall. The goal of 7dots is to help you with this problem by offering a simply interface that allows you to keep your information organized in a way that makes most sense for you. We’re doing our best to keep our own ideas of organization out and allow for complete customizability. So the first question that comes up is security. That’s a very important question that we’re taking seriously. [...]

http://7dots.com/. Retrieved on 2007-05-11 11:18.


A peek at what's coming

  • API - so you can use the service how you want, and in new and interesting ways.
  • Security at the data level – passwords stored securely, even from site admins
  • Tags – you love them, we love them, they make life easy.
  • Customizable – define new types of password data.
  • AJAXified – making the interface faster.
  • Ruby on Rails – written with a great framework
  • OS X Dashboard Widget – need we say more?
  • Sharable – easily pass on data to co-workers, family, friends


Eventable

Eventable - Online Event Registration (making life simple) (https://www.eventable.com/). Retrieved on 2007-05-11 11:18.


What is Eventable?

Eventable is an online registration tool that offers an easy way for people to sign up for your events.

Why did we develop this?

The Eventable team is focused on helping others create community and share passion. We noticed that getting people together was a tough hurdle and decided to do something about it.


Calculators

Instacalc

[Embeddable (category)] [Embeddable in a blog (category)]

http://instacalc.com/


Hassle-free Sharing. There's no cost, no login and no install needed. 1. Link to any calc from your blog, email or forum post. 2. Embed a live calc in your website. 3. Browse and share calcs in the public library.


Want Instacalc on your site? Embed this code:

<script>instacalc_embed_height = 300; instacalc_embed_width = 425; instacalc_embed_url = 'http://instacalc.com/embed/?d=QSBwcm9ncmFtbWVyJ3MgY2FsY3VsYXRvci4gWW91IGNhbiBjb252ZXJ0IHRvIGhleC9iaW5hcnksIHVzZSBsb2dpY2FsIG9wZXJhdG9ycywgaGF2ZSB1bml0cyBsaWtlIEdCIG9yIGticHMsIGFuZCBldmVuIGFkZCBjb21tZW50cy4&c=Ly8gaGV4IGFuZCBiaW5hcnl8MHhmZnwwYjEwMDF8aGV4KDI1NSl8YmluKDkpfHwvLyBiaW5hcnkgb3BlcmF0b3JzfGJpbigxOSl8YmluKDcpfGJpbigxOSBhbmQgNyl8YmluKDE5IG9yIDcpfGJpbigxOSB4b3IgNyl8fC8vIHVzZSBjb21wdXRlciB1bml0c3xoZXgoMU1CKXw2MEdCIC8gNzAwTUJ8&s=sssssssssssssssss&v=0.9';</script>
<script src="http://instacalc.com/javascripts/embed.js"></script>

Shazam! A live calculator for your site. Now the fine print:

  • The embeddable version is streamlined; charts appear only on the main site.
  • There may be small messages to support InstaCalc development. I'm looking into a premium version that you can brand and customize yourself.
  • Not working on your site? Try the HTML version. (The Javascript is preferred, but not supported by all sites and blogs.)

As a platform

(Or "The platform")

By Joel Spolsky (June 13, 2004). How Microsoft Lost the API War - Joel on Software (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/APIWar.html). Retrieved on 2007-05-11 11:18.


Enter the Web

I'm not sure how I managed to get this far without mentioning the Web. Every developer has a choice to make when they plan a new software application: they can build it for the web or they can build a "rich client" application that runs on PCs. The basic pros and cons are simple: Web applications are easier to deploy, while rich clients offer faster response time enabling much more interesting user interfaces.

Web Applications are easier to deploy because there's no installation involved. Installing a web application means typing a URL in the address bar. Today I installed Google's new email application by typing Alt+D, gmail, Ctrl+Enter. There are far fewer compatibility problems and problems coexisting with other software. Every user of your product is using the same version so you never have to support a mix of old versions. You can use any programming environment you want because you only have to get it up and running on your own server. Your application is automatically available at virtually every reasonable computer on the planet. Your customers' data, too, is automatically available at virtually every reasonable computer on the planet.

But there's a price to pay in the smoothness of the user interface. Here are a few examples of things you can't really do well in a web application:

  1. Create a fast drawing program
  2. Build a real-time spell checker with wavy red underlines
  3. Warn users that they are going to lose their work if they hit the close box of the browser [Actually, I think you can do that. --Tyler]
  4. Update a small part of the display based on a change that the user makes without a full roundtrip to the server [Actually, you can... DHTML? --Tyler]
  5. Create a fast keyboard-driven interface that doesn't require the mouse
  6. Let people continue working when they are not connected to the Internet [!! --Tyler]

These are not all big issues. Some of them will be solved very soon by witty Javascript developers. Two new web applications, Gmail and Oddpost, both email apps, do a really decent job of working around or completely solving some of these issues. And users don't seem to care about the little UI glitches and slowness of web interfaces. Almost all the normal people I know are perfectly happy with web-based email, for some reason, no matter how much I try to convince them that the rich client is, uh, richer.

So the Web user interface is about 80% there, and even without new web browsers we can probably get 95% there. This is Good Enough for most people and it's certainly good enough for developers, who have voted to develop almost every significant new application as a web application.

Which means, suddenly, Microsoft's API doesn't matter so much. Web applications don't require Windows.

...

I'm a Little Bit Sad About This, Myself

I'm actually a little bit sad about this, myself. To me the Web is great but Web-based applications with their sucky, high-latency, inconsistent user interfaces are a huge step backwards in daily usability. I love my rich client applications and would go nuts if I had to use web versions of the applications I use daily: Visual Studio, CityDesk, Outlook, Corel PhotoPaint, QuickBooks. But that's what developers are going to give us. Nobody (by which, again, I mean "fewer than 10,000,000 people") wants to develop for the Windows API any more. Venture Capitalists won't invest in Windows applications because they're so afraid of competition from Microsoft. And most users don't seem to care about crappy Web UIs as much as I do.

...

Much as I hate to say it, a huge chunk of developers have long since moved to the web and refuse to move back. Most .NET (c) developers are ASP.NET developers, developing for Microsoft's web server. ASP.NET (c) is brilliant; I've been working with web development for ten years and it's really just a generation ahead of everything out there. But it's a server technology, so clients can use any kind of desktop they want. And it runs pretty well under Linux using Mono (c).

None of this bodes well for Microsoft and the profits it enjoyed thanks to its API power. The new API is HTML, and the new winners in the application development marketplace will be the people who can make HTML sing.

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